Breaking 12 TGA Codes

Breaking 12 TGA Codes

Page six of the Therapeutic Goods Advertising Code contains General Principles. These are listed here, along with a link that shows how, in my opinion, IHRB and Sam Cohen break all 12 of the Advertising Codes. A full page is dedicated to each of the Codes. Just click on the links below so that you […]

Working outside the laws

Working outside the laws

The TGA’s Therapeutic Goods Advertising Code 4.1.a says: ‘An advertisement for therapeutic goods must comply with the statutes and common law of the Commonwealth, States and Territories.’ Mr Cohen is advertising a medical treatment that uses products that are not approved for the treatment of hair. He personally sells medications, yet he is not authorised, not licensed, […]

Unverified statements

Unverified statements

The TGA’s Therapeutic Goods Advertising Code 4.1.b says: ‘An advertisement for therapeutic goods must contain correct and balanced statements only and claims which the sponsor has already verified.’ IHRB has no verifications. It has conducted no clinical trials. It does not disclose the main ingredients. Mr Cohen speaks about his herbal Indian Curries, but refused to tell […]

Unrealistic expectations

Unrealistic expectations

The TGA’s Therapeutic Goods Advertising Code 4.2.a says: ‘An advertisement for therapeutic goods must not be likely to lead to consumers self-diagnosing or inappropriately treating potentially serious diseases.’ Mr Cohen is quoted saying, ‘I have achieved unparalleled results in re-growth of hair to the utmost satisfaction of every person I have treated.’ [UPDATE: New Sanctions in November […]

Treating serious diseases

Treating serious diseases

The TGA’s Therapeutic Goods Advertising Code 4.2.b says: ‘An advertisement for therapeutic goods must not be likely to lead to consumers self-diagnosing or inappropriately treating potentially serious diseases.’ Mr Cohen’s suite of medications include products like Loniten, which are not approved, and which are dangerous, thereby triggering the potential for a myriad of adverse effects that […]

Misleading and deceptive

Misleading and deceptive

The TGA’s Therapeutic Goods Advertising Code 4.2.c says: ‘An advertisement for therapeutic goods must not mislead, or be likely to mislead, directly or by implication or through emphasis, comparisons, contrasts or omissions.’ IHRB misleads its clients about every possible aspect of the treatment. It speaks about a money a back guarantee that simply does not exist. […]

Exploiting consumers

Exploiting consumers

The TGA’s Therapeutic Goods Advertising Code 4.2.d says: ‘An advertisement for therapeutic goods must not abuse the trust or exploit the lack of knowledge of consumers or contain language which could bring about fear or distress.’ IHRB uses the term ‘the balding gene’. No client would really know what this means. It sounds even more technical […]

Harmful consequences

Harmful consequences

The TGA’s Therapeutic Goods Advertising Code 4.2.e says: ‘An advertisement for therapeutic goods must not contain any matter which is likely to lead a person to believe (ii) that harmful consequences may result from the therapeutic goods not being used.’ All IHRB advertisements urge the reader to act now before it is too late, saying that […]

Inappropriate use

Inappropriate use

The TGA’s Therapeutic Goods Advertising Code 4.2.f says: ‘An advertisement for therapeutic goods must not encourage, or be likely to encourage, inappropriate or excessive use.’ IHRB ads plant seeds in a reader’s mind. This advertisement warns readers about unnecessary cosmetic products, so as to pave the way to sell unnecessary cosmetic products. Everything about IHRB’s ads […]